Cervical Cancer Cure Rate

cervical-cancer-cure-rate
Cervical cancer cure rate - The chance of cures for cancer, and therefore also in cervical cancer, is usually expressed in five-year survival (the survival after a period of five years after treatment). The longer there is no evidence that cervical cancer has returned after the treatment, the smaller the chance that it will return; five years after the treatment, this change has become so small that you no longer have to be checked.

The survival after five years of cervical cancer depends on the stage. In stage I the survival after five years is about 75 to 90 percent. In stage II, this survival is about 45 to 60 percent. In stage III approximately 20 to 25 percent. And in stage IV the survival after five years is about 5 to 10 percent.
On average, about 70 percent of all patients with cervical cancer heal. What you can expect as an individual patient for the future is best discussed with your doctor.

The gynecologist will discuss the best treatment with you. The treatment is in principle dependent on the results found in the various studies. However, you yourself are the one who decides whether you want to undergo the proposed treatment. It is possible that the burden or the possible side effects or consequences of a treatment no longer outweigh the expected results.

It is also possible that you no longer want to try to heal but want to make your life as pleasant as possible. This can reduce or stop blood loss with supportive treatments such as radiation. Discuss your complaints and ideas with your doctor.



Possible side effects and complications

Usually, the treatment of cervical cancer is a long-term treatment that requires a lot of energy. Fatigue or a feeling of weakness can last for months or even years.

Consequences of the surgery - Early consequences
As with any surgery, complications can occur with a surgery for cervical cancer. There is a small chance of damaging the ureters, especially if the lymph nodes in the pelvis are also removed.

Consequences of the surgery - Late consequences
Consequences for fertility
If the uterus needs to be removed, you can no longer become pregnant. However, there is sometimes a possibility to preserve one or both ovaries. Discuss this with your gynecologist.

Undesirable loss of urine
Some women have difficulty stopping urine after surgery. This may be because small nerves of the bladder are damaged during surgery. That is not always preventable. If these nerves no longer work properly, the bladder may become too full. You will suddenly lose urine. The first months after the surgery, it is, therefore, advisable to urinate at regular intervals. Usually, the signal that you have to urinate returns gradually after a while.

Lymphedema
After the surgery, fluid can accumulate in the legs (see also www.kwfkankerbestrijding.nl).

Sexological consequences
The possible consequences of uterine removal and removal of the ovaries differ from everyone. Because the cranial tissue is removed from the cervix, the sheath may have become slightly shorter. This can make the sex feel different. The elimination of the ovaries may lead to a shortage of sex hormones, which may reduce the desire for sex. Invisible effects such as fatigue or emotions can also play a role in lovemaking.

Early in the transition
After the removal or irradiation of the ovaries, the production of certain hormones stops. This will speed you into the transition. Just like the natural transition, it can cause symptoms such as hot flushes, excessive perspiration, and a dry sheath (see POF, premature ovarian failure, and transition).

Consequences of radiation
Early consequences
Healthy cells are also damaged during irradiation. This can cause you to suffer from fatigue, frequent urge to defecate, abdominal cramps or diarrhea and sometimes complaints can occur as if there is a bladder infection. After internal radiation, you usually have few complaints. Sometimes urinating is a bit sensitive for a few days.

Late consequences
After removal or irradiation of the ovaries, the production of certain hormones stops. This will speed you into the transition. Just like the natural transition, it can cause symptoms such as hot flashes or a dry sheath (see POF, premature ovarian failure, and transition).

Consequences of chemotherapy
Early consequences
The chemotherapy also affects healthy cells. As a result, unpleasant side effects may occur. Hair loss, nausea, vomiting, intestinal disorders, an increased risk of infections and fatigue are some examples of this. Treatment with chemotherapy can, therefore, be difficult. Some side effects can be prevented with medication. The side effects of chemotherapy gradually decrease after stopping.

Late consequences
Many women are still tired for a long time after a treatment with chemotherapy. Some chemotherapy may also cause POF, an early transition.

*Image source : Mayo Clinic

References :
  1. National Cancer Institute
  2. Ziekenhuis Nij Smellinghe
  3. American Cancer Society

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